Masi's random bag of stuff

parislemon:

markcoatney:

washingtonpost:

silentgiantla:

Animated artwork by Rebecca Mock

Fine, detailed and subtle animated artwork created by New York illustrator Rebecca Mock. Apparently the animated gif back to stay, gradually more and more people are exploring this old format and customers asking for shouting. Several of these illustrations were created for the New York Times or The Warlus magazine.

Beautiful gif art. <3

Oh my Lord. We have to have these at AJAM.

Lovely.

Uberification of the US Service Economy

schlafnotes:

Since I joined RRE Ventures last fall, I’ve spent time researching mobile on-demand services that we are able to access with a push of a button. “On-demand mobile services” (ODMS) is a broad category so I believe it’s important to start with a definition. My friend Semil Shah defines ODMS as…

atlasofprejudice:

20 ways to slice the European continent from Atlas of Prejudice 2 by Yanko Tsvetkov.

atlasofprejudice:

20 ways to slice the European continent from Atlas of Prejudice 2 by Yanko Tsvetkov.

“The novelist Steve Erickson, in a 1992 review of Fire Walk With Me, is one of the few critics who gave any indication of even trying to understand what the movie was trying to do: “We always knew Laura was a wild girl, the homecoming femme fatale who was crazy for cocaine and fucked roadhouse drunks less for the money than the sheer depravity of it, but the movie is finally not so much interested in the titillation of that depravity as [in] her torment, depicted in a performance by Sheryl Lee so vixenish and demonic it’s hard to know whether it’s terrible or a tour de force. [But not trying too terribly hard because now watch:] Her fit of giggles over the body of a man whose head has just been blown off might be an act of innocence of damnation [get ready:] or both.” *Or* both? Of *course* both. This is what Lynch is *about* in this movie: *both* innocence and damnation; *both* sinned-against and sinning. Laura Palmer in Fire Walk With Me is *both* “good” and “bad,” and yet also neither; she’s complex, contradictory, real. And we hate this possibility in movies; we hate this “*both*” shit. “*Both*” comes off as sloppy characterization, muddy filmmaking, lack of focus. At that rate that’s what we criticized Fire Walk With Me’s Laura for. But I submit that the real reason we criticized and disliked Lynch’s Laura’s muddy *both*ness is that it requires of us an empathetic confrontation with the exact same muddy *both*ness in ourselves and our intimates that makes the real world of moral selves so tense and uncomfortable, a *both*ness we go to the movies to get a couple hours’ fucking relief from. A movie that requires that these features of ourselves and the world not be dreamed away or judged away or massaged away but *acknowledged*, and not just acknowledged but *drawn upon* in our emotional relationship with the heroine herself — this movie is going to make us feel uncomfortable, pissed off; we’re going to feel, in Premiere magazine’s own head editor’s word, “Betrayed.””

—   

David Foster Wallace from an appendix to his famous essay on David Lynch. 

From an interview with the artist Margaret Chardiet aka Pharmakon on her sister’s website (presumably by her sister):

The name it’s self is the gateway to understanding what the project is about. Pharmakon is an ancient Greek word; it means both poison and remedy, at the same time. It is the philosophy of something being dual in nature. The idea that something which could harm you, could also help you. But the distinction that is important to me is that the project is about duality, not juxtaposition, it is not about two things that are on opposite sides of the same spectrum, it is about two things that are opposite being the same thing.

There are many themes that fall under that umbrella. If you break [Pharmakon] down to it’s core, it is human connection. It’s not some cold power electronics project. It’s hot and sticky. It is the moisture in your groin. What is it? You can’t help it; it’s just there. I didn’t mean to put it there. I know it’s offensive, but the human race is disgusting. If they think I am acceptable, then I am doing something wrong, frankly.”

I don’t think that Fire Walk With Me is a great movie but Wallace’s interpretation of it makes me like it more, and his explanation of what makes something Lynchian helped me understand why I am so drawn to his aesthetic: its unflinching depiction of the mixed up nature of reality, with nothing to separate dark and light, them and you, just a terrifying sense that you do have some of this darkness inside of you and so does everyone you know. 

There’s obviously a feminist interpretation here, and I think there’s a reason so many female and queer artists recently have embraced a Lynchian aesthetic, as I think Wallace is points out that it is inherently part of the way “others” experience reality and employing it is a great way to expose that to those who don’t naturally feel it. 

(via likeapairofbottlerockets)

What I Learned Negotiating With Steve Jobs

heidiroizen:

Fresh out of Stanford Business School, I started a software company, T/Maker, with my brother Peter. He was the software architect and I was, well, everything else. Our little company was among the first to ship software for the Macintosh, and we developed a positive reputation among the members…

Why we need things

Contrary to what we ordinarily believe, consciousness is not a stable, self-regulating entity. When left to itself, deprived of organized sensory input, the mind begins to wander and is soon prey to unbridled hallucinations. Most people require an external order to keep randomness from invading their mind. It is very difficult to keep ideas straight without the assistance of a sensory template that gives them boundaries and direction. When people have nothing to do, they generally begin to fret, become depressed, and become anxious; unless they turn on the television or find. some other activity that will direct their attention, their moods progressively deteriorate. That is why people report their worst moods on Sunday mornings, when, deprived of a cultural script, they flounder in the quagmire of freedom. The mind was not designed to be self-regulating or to function well when idling.

[…]

This is where objects can be helpful. As Arendt observed:

The things of the world have the function of stabilizing human life, and their objectivity lies in the fact that … men, their ever-changing nature notwithstanding, can retrieve their sameness, that is, their identity, by being related to the same chair and the same table. In other words, against the subjectivity of men stands the objectivity of the man-made world …. Without a world between men and nature, there is eternal movement, but no objectivity. 
(Arendt 1958: 137)

Artifacts help objectify the self in at least three major ways. They do so first by demonstrating the owner’s power, vital erotic energy, and place in the social hierarchy. Second, objects reveal the continuity of the self through time, by providing foci of involvement in the present, mementos and souvenirs of the past, and signposts to future goals. Third, objects ‘, give concrete evidence of one’s place in a social network as symbols (literally, the joining together) of valued relationships. In these three things stabilize our sense of who we are; they give a permanent shape to our views of ourselves that otherwise would quickly dissolve in the flux of consciousness.

http://butisitart.wikispaces.com/file/view/Csikszentmihalyi.pdf

Learnings from six months as a first-time engineering manager

charlax:

It’s demanding

“Humans are much more complicated than machines”: one never experiences this saying more than when moving from a technical contributor role to a manager one. While debugging can be an exasperating task, discouragement is a feeling all managers need to learn to control, both in…

slavin:

Engineered for men who make the exception to physical rules except for the part where they strip down to get searched for metal and explosives after waiting on a long line full of Swiss people. Men who make exception to all the physical rules except that one: when it’s over and you are a rule breaker again after passing through security buy a watch why don’t you (at Zürich Airport (ZRH))

slavin:

Engineered for men who make the exception to physical rules except for the part where they strip down to get searched for metal and explosives after waiting on a long line full of Swiss people. Men who make exception to all the physical rules except that one: when it’s over and you are a rule breaker again after passing through security buy a watch why don’t you (at Zürich Airport (ZRH))

(via mostlysignssomeportents)

museumuesum:

Ken Griffiths

originally published in The Sunday Times Magazine in 1973